Bamboo Flooring Review

For this bamboo flooring review we’re going to examine the pros and cons of bamboo flooring, to help you decide if bamboo flooring is right for you and your family.

Without further ado, here is a handy-dandy scannable bamboo flooring review list of the pros and cons of bamboo flooring:

Pros of Bamboo Flooring

  • The Value of Eco-friendly
    Bamboo flooring is your most eco-friendly option as bamboo plants reach maturity in just 7 years and can be quickly regrown for maximum output—unlike trees which take decades. This short lifespan and fast growth rate makes bamboo the most sustainable flooring resource. But getting bamboo floors isn’t just en-vogue currently or doing your part for the environment—it also adds value to your home as ‘green’ homes sell for up to 9% more than their non-friendly counterparts, and while bamboo floors alone won’t turn your home green—it could start you on a great path to value-building eco-friendly living.
  • Price
    While it depends on the type of hardwood you are considering and the thickness of the bamboo you’re considering, bamboo is often the more economical choice. Not only can it be cheaper than its hard wood alternatives, it is often harder (think: durability) than its wood counterparts.
  • Style
    Bamboo can be installed in its natural wood-like grain colour and texture—or you can choose from a wide variety of styles and colours. As bamboo takes colour stain well the sky is the limit with colour choices.

Cons

  • Scratches and Scrapes
    Bamboo flooring can be difficult to maintain in pristine condition as it has a tendency to get small scratches in the finish. The best way to avoid this is to keep the floor clean as small debris, when stepped on and when furniture is laid on top of, can cause small scratches.
  • Moisture, Humidity and Water Damage
    While bamboo is more water-, humidity- and moisture-resistant than most of its hardwood counterparts it isn’t as water-friendly as an option like ceramic flooring, or any other non-natural fibre material. So, if your home is in one of the more humid areas of the GTA (and you don’t have a dehumidifier) then a non-natural fibre option may be best.
  • No Across-the-Board Grading System
    As most bamboo flooring is imported from China and other Asian countries it doesn’t (yet) have a standard grading system. So, when purchasing bamboo flooring you will want to ask the opinion of a professional installer to help determine the grade and quality.

So, when it comes to a bamboo flooring review and the pros and cons of bamboo flooring—it comes down to your needs and your lifestyle. If a beautiful, cost-effective, eco-friendly option is what you are looking for then you will likely be a bamboo fan—but if you have a humid home that often has small debris on the floor (think: kids!) then bamboo might not be your choice material.